Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Forden, Carie
dc.contributor.author Kimunya, Faith Wanjiru
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-12T07:22:36Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-12T16:00:05Z
dc.date.created 2012 Fall
dc.date.issued 2012-11-12T07:22:36Z
dc.identifier.uri http://dar.aucegypt.edu/handle/10526/3283
dc.description.abstract Much of the research on alcohol and drug abuse prevention examines general risk and protective factors without considering gender and is conducted primarily in Western cultural contexts. However, gender and culture are important to consider in the design and implementation of alcohol and drug abuse prevention programs because both gender and culture can play a role in the development of risk and protective factors. In order to assess the role that gender and culture might play in alcohol and drug abuse, a literature review was conducted. The literature review focused on the gender differences in reasons for alcohol and drug abuse and analyzed the differences and similarities between Western and African populations. The information gathered was then used to assess existing evidence-based substance abuse prevention programs listed in registries. These programs were examined to determine which risk and protective factors they address, and given gender and cultural differences in alcohol and drug abuse, whether these programs are likely to be effective for men and women across cultures. Finally, the prevention programs identified, using specific criteria, as being most suitable for adaptation in Kenya were selected and a website was created for disseminating culturally appropriate best practices. en
dc.description.sponsorship I would like to extend my sincere appreciation to Dr. Carie Forden, my thesis advisor, who has always been patient and available especially in those times that I felt overwhelmed. Your feedback and suggestions have been so helpful and I sincerely have learnt a lot from you. Thank you for believing in me particularly when I had doubts about this whole project. To Dr. Amy Carrillo, who is always willing to help in any way possible and has constantly been a source of encouragement and support. Thank you for the feedback that you have given me during this whole process. It has been my pleasure working with you and you truly are an inspiration. To Dr. Catherine Gachutha, who willing agreed to be part of this committee in the last minute. Thank you for all the feedback that you have given me and for showing interest in this project. I believe that your participation was not mere coincidence and that you will play an important role in advocating for gender and culturally informed prevention programs in Kenya. Finally, I thank my classmates for their encouragement and insights during this journey. I believe that the knowledge and skills that you have acquired will be instrumental in your contributions to the development of Egypt. en
dc.format.extent 90 p. en
dc.format.medium theses en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.rights Author retains all rights with regard to copyright. en
dc.subject Women en
dc.subject Kenya en
dc.subject Substance abuse en
dc.subject Alcoholism en
dc.subject Prevention en
dc.subject Drug abuse en
dc.subject Men en
dc.subject Rehabilitation en
dc.subject.lcsh Thesis (M.A.)--American University in Cairo en
dc.title Gender differences in reasons for alcohol and drug abuse among youth in Kenya: programs for prevention en
dc.type Text en
dc.subject.discipline Community Psychology en
dc.rights.access This item is available en
dc.contributor.department American University in Cairo. Dept. of Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology, and Egyptology en
dc.description.irb American University in Cairo Institutional Review Board approval is not necessary for this item, since the research is not concerned with living human beings or bodily tissue samples. en
dc.contributor.committeeMember Carrillo, Amy
dc.contributor.committeeMember Gachutha, Catherine


Files in this item

Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Theses and Dissertations [705]
    This collection includes theses and dissertations authored by American University in Cairo graduate students.

Show simple item record