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dc.contributor.advisor Ikram, Salima
dc.contributor.author Camacho, Kenaya
dc.date.accessioned 2014-05-26T09:20:00Z
dc.date.available 2014-05-26T15:00:04Z
dc.date.created 2014 Spring en
dc.date.issued 2014-05-26
dc.identifier.uri http://dar.aucegypt.edu/handle/10526/3939
dc.description.abstract Isis and Nephthys, two iconic sister goddesses of ancient Egypt are well known for their presence in funerary scenes. In representations of the goddesses as a pair on coffins and sarcophagi dating from the Old Kingdom through the Ptolemaic-Roman Period, there is an alternating dominance between which goddess is placed on the headboard and footboard as well as who is placed on right and left proper of vignettes on these objects. This dissertation will examine what influences the positioning, dominance and orientation of Isis and Nephthys, on coffins and sarcophagi to determine how these positions affect our knowledge of female deities, their alternative positioning in art, and the religious ideals of the divine during a particular time period. en
dc.format.extent 201 p. en
dc.format.medium theses en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.rights Author retains all rights with regard to copyright. en
dc.subject Coffins en
dc.subject Sarcophagi en
dc.subject Egypt, Ancient en
dc.subject Goddesses, Egypt en
dc.subject Egypt--Religion--332 B.C.-640 A.D en
dc.subject.lcsh Thesis (M.A.)--American University in Cairo en
dc.subject.lcsh Coffins -- Egypt.
dc.subject.lcsh Sarcophagi -- Egypt.
dc.subject.lcsh Goddesses, Egyptian.
dc.subject.lcsh Egypt -- Religion -- 332 B.C.-640 A.D.
dc.title Head or foot, right or left: analyzing the positions of Isis and Nephthys on coffins and sarcophagi from the Old Kingdom (2663-2160 BC) through Ptolemaic-Roman periods (332BC-395 AD) en
dc.type Text en
dc.subject.discipline Egyptology en
dc.rights.access This item is available en
dc.contributor.department American University in Cairo. Dept. of Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology, and Egyptology en
dc.description.irb American University in Cairo Institutional Review Board approval is not necessary for this item, since the research is not concerned with living human beings or bodily tissue samples. en
dc.contributor.committeeMember Sabbahy, Lisa
dc.contributor.committeeMember Haikal, Fayza


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  • Theses and Dissertations [1863]
    This collection includes theses and dissertations authored by American University in Cairo graduate students.

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