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dc.contributor.advisor Escorihuela, Alejandro Lorite
dc.contributor.advisor Monforte, Tanya
dc.contributor.advisor Sayed, Hani
dc.contributor.advisor Fahmy, Nabil
dc.contributor.author Al-Kassir, Elham Eidarous
dc.creator Al-Kassir, Elham Eidarous
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-29T18:00:37Z
dc.date.available 10000-01-01T18:00:37Z
dc.date.created 2010 Spring
dc.date.issued 2010-05-29T18:00:37Z
dc.identifier.uri http://dar.aucegypt.edu/handle/10526/720
dc.description.abstract The recognition and protection of the right to strike have seen huge developments since the beginning of the twentieth century. The traditional basis upon which this right was based on the international arena and in national jurisdictions is one that views the right to strike as an essential tool in the hands of workers and their representative organizations to strengthen their bargaining power against employers, which means that the right to strike is one of economic and social rights enjoyed by humans in their capacity as workers. Yet, there are calls for widening the basis of recognition of this right to include appeal to civil liberties. This thesis discusses the validity and desirability of these proposals, and concludes by calling for the preservation and development of the traditional basis upon which international and national labour standards have built the right to strike. en
dc.format.medium theses en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.rights Author retains all rights with regard to copyright. en
dc.subject.lcsh Thesis (M.A.)--American University in Cairo en
dc.subject.lcsh Strikes and lockouts -- Law and legislation.
dc.title Should the right to strike be justified as a civil or political right? en
dc.type Text en
dc.subject.discipline International Human Rights Law en
dc.rights.access This item is restricted forever en
dc.contributor.department American University in Cairo. Dept. of Law en


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  • Theses and Dissertations [1835]
    This collection includes theses and dissertations authored by American University in Cairo graduate students.

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